VEHICLES


FCEVs are eligible for a $5,000 *California rebate and Federal tax credit.

Be an eligible applicant and purchase or lease an eligible vehicleApply online prior to exhaustion of available rebate fundsSubmit copies of supporting documentsOwn and register the vehicle in California for 30 months

*Important Information from the State of California
Funding is currently exhausted. All applications submitted after June 10, 2016 will be placed on a rebate waitlist. Read more.

FCEVs are eligible for a California HOV sticker.

More information on California HOV stickers

 


Click here for application form and information

HOW IT WORKS

A fuel cell creates electricity from a chemical reaction, not combustion. You get awesome performance, an incredible ride and a carpool sticker that tells the world you're aiming for zero (emissions, that is.)

Fuel cells create electricity from reactants stored externally. A proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell uses hydrogen and oxygen as the reactants. In its simplest form, a PEM fuel cell is two electrodes—the anode and the cathode—separated by a catalyst-coated membrane. Hydrogen from the vehicle’s storage tank enters one side of the fuel cell stack and air on the other side. The hydrogen is naturally attracted to the oxygen in the air. As the hydrogen molecule moves through the stack to get to the oxygen, the catalyst forces the hydrogen to separate into electron and proton.

The proton moves through the membrane and the electron moves to the anode. The electricity flows into a power module, which distributes electricity to the electric motor that turns the wheels of the car. The power module also distributes electricity to the air conditioning, sound system and other on-board devices.

At the cathode, the electron recombines with the proton, and the hydrogen joins with the oxygen to create the vehicle’s only tailpipe emission—water. Fuel cells produce electricity as long as fuel is supplied.

VEHICLE SAFETY

From bumper to bumper, FCEVs are designed with safety in mind. Engineering, equipment, and safety codes and standards are designed for hydrogen and fuels cells. What you see, though, is a great vehicle for you and your family.

FCEVs are as safe as any vehicle on the road. CaFCP vehicle manufacturer members subject fuel cell vehicle models to extensive safety testing prior to releasing them on public roads. Current testing employs both destructive and nondestructive evaluations and occurs at the component, system, and vehicle level.

The on-board hydrogen storage tanks are extremely strong, carbon-fiber wrapped tanks. Similar to CNG tanks, hydrogen tanks are put through a battery of extreme tests, including bonfire, pressure cycling, impact, burst and penetration tests. The tanks must meet strict manufacturer guidelines and applicable DOT criteria for acceptable use on public roads.

Unlike other fuels that you can smell or see, hydrogen is colorless, odorless and non-toxic. Natural gas is odorized with mercaptan so you can smell a release. That’s not possible with hydrogen because it is such a small and buoyant molecule that no other substance can move and diffuse as quickly. In other words, by the time you smelled the odorant, the hydrogen might have already moved to another location. You can, however, hear a hydrogen leak as the high-pressure fuel moves through TPRD orifice.

CaFCP does extensive training with fire fighters and other first responders in the communities where FCEVs and FCEBs are and will be deployed. The combination of vehicle design, safety systems and knowledgeable responders make FCEVs as safe as other vehicles on the road.

RANGE

100%

2016 Gasoline four-door sedan – 434 miles

72%

2016 FCEV four-door sedan – 312 miles

23%

2016 BEV four-door sedan – 73 miles

*Number of miles from a full tank of fuel or charge (x/434 miles) | https://www.fueleconomy.gov/feg/fcv_sbs.shtml

You can go a long way on a small amount of hydrogen. Fuel cells are 2-3 times more efficient than combustion engines, and making hydrogen is an energy efficient chemical process. You'll drive as far as you drive today on about 1/3 as much fuel. It's better living through chemistry.

Energy efficiency is important, but not the whole picture. Fuel economy—“miles per gallon”—is a result of engine (or motor) efficiency, size, weight, road conditions and driving style. A bus and a car could both have a fuel cell that operates at 60% efficiency, but because the bus is heavier and stops and starts often, it will have a lower fuel economy than the car.

WHAT CUSTOMERS SAY

"My son calls it the muscle car because of the looks of the front, and also because of the way it just takes off. It's really fantastic to drive."


Theo Etrue-Ellis
Toyota Mirai Driver

10 Facts about FCEVS

About the same cost as gasoline now on a per mile basis, and expected to decline as more cars are on the road

Cost to refill

Cost to refill


Automakers include three years of hydrogen fuel with the sale or lease of a vehicle

Fuel cells are designed to last the lifetime of the vehicle

Durability

Durability


Fuel cells are designed to last the lifetime of the vehicle

Electric motor and drive train—quiet, smooth and powerful

Electric

Electric


Electric motor and drive train—quiet, smooth and powerful

Zero tailpipe emissions—just a little water vapor

Emissions

Emissions


Zero tailpipe emissions—just a little water vapor

Vehicle can operate in sub-zero temperatures and desert conditions…and everywhere in between

Extreme heat and cold

Extreme heat and cold


Vehicle can operate in sub-zero temperatures and desert conditions…and everywhere in between

HOV white sticker issued at the dealership

HOV sticker

HOV sticker


Travel single in the carpool lane

Range - Similar to a gasoline car—250+ miles per fill

Range

Range


Similar to a gasoline car—250+ miles per fill

$5,000 California rebate plus federal tax credit

Rebate

Rebate


$5,000 California rebate plus federal tax credit

About 3-to-5 minutes to fill the tank

Refill time

Refill time


About 3-to-5 minutes to fill the tank

As safe as any other vehicle on the road—some say even safer

Safety

Safety


As safe as any other vehicle on the road—some say even safer